As food TV explodes, ‘Taste the Nation: Holiday Edition’ and ‘The Great British Baking Show’ offer tasty entertainment

Keep in mind when “Top Chef” was just one of the number of cooking competitions on Tv set? And when “The Wonderful British Baking Show” charmed viewers with its delightfully normal beginner bakers who worked difficult to exhibit off their homespun techniques?

Given that those people relatively uncomplicated times, Tv set has been engaged in a foodstuff explosion, with what appears like a hardly ever-ending source of demonstrates in which qualified cooks check their skills, amateurs try to impress judges, cooks host travelogue-design collection impressed by the late Anthony Bourdain, and celebs in look for of a new gig determine to host cooking displays, even if they really do not know their way all over a kitchen area.

Appear on. Did we genuinely need to have Selena Gomez and Paris Hilton web hosting their personal cooking reveals on, respectively, HBO Max and Netflix? Did viewers learn something from looking at Brooklyn Beckham – far better recognized as the son of David Beckham and Victoria “Posh Spice” Beckham – placing pre-cooked bacon and sausage and a hard-cooked, damaged-yolk egg on chilly white bread for a “Today” clearly show cooking section?

Not actually. And unquestionably nope, when it arrives to that unappetizing-hunting breakfast sandwich, entire with a ketchup drizzle. But we obtained them, in any case.

Even though all of that culinary overkill tends to make us want to get to for an antacid, it’s a pleasure to report that there is a new time of “The Excellent British Baking Show” streaming on Netflix, and that “Top Chef” host Padma Lakshmi is back for “Taste the Nation: Holiday break Edition,” a new spherical of episodes of her Hulu present, which will take a Bourdain-like method in investigating immigrant and indigenous cultures and how their traditions have influenced what we assume of as American cooking.

Both of those shows are reminders of how food stuff-focused Tv set can transport us, featuring comforting escapism in the situation of “The Good British Baking Clearly show,” and blending record, sociology, recent affairs, and mouth-watering views of tasty food stuff in “Taste the Nation: Holiday break Version.”

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Denver Beer Co. Fuels Up Culinary Program With ‘DBC Eats’ Food Truck



DENVER, Colorado – Denver Beer Co. today announced the launch of the DBC Eats food truck, an extension of the Denver Beer Co South Downing location’s DBC Eats kitchen. The DBC Eats food truck will park at the Denver Beer Co. Platte Street taproom, offering food service to brewery patrons Thursday through Sunday, year-round. DBC Eats will fire up its grills on October 28th, 2021, offering a craveable and comforting menu to pair with Denver Beer Co.’s craft beers.

The DBC Eats food truck will provide walk-up service to patrons daily from lunch to dinner to late-night snacks at the Platte Street taproom. The menu will focus on approachable, beer-centric fare to include elevated comfort foods as well as healthy and vegetarian options. The food truck will also host special menu items and pairings with Cerveceria Colorado, including “Venga Viernes,” a Friday beer and taco special, and churros for special events.

“The DBC Eats Food Truck allows us to provide a consistent and customized culinary experience to pair perfectly with our craft beers” stated Denver Beer Co. co-founder Charlie Berger. “We’ve always known that a food truck is a great addition to a brewery patio, it has been part of our customer experience from day one. Creating our own culinary program is a natural next step in the process.”

Denver Beer Co was founded in 2011 and has four breweries including a taproom and beer garden on Platte Street in downtown Denver, a taproom and brewery in Olde Town Arvada, a taproom and kitchen on South Downing Street,  and a production brewery, Canworks, in Denver’s Sunnyside neighborhood which focuses primarily on the brewing, canning, and bottling of beer for distribution.

About Denver Beer Co.

Independently owned and operated, Denver Beer Co. is founded on the core belief that beer is serious fun. Using locally sourced grain and the finest ingredients available, traditional methods and innovative spirit, our team creates craft beer that is approachable, fun, damn delicious and consistently wins awards to prove it.  We believe in environmental stewardship and our corporate responsibility to operate sustainably which

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Sean Sherman shares his path to becoming an Indigenous food chef

Sean Sherman is Ogalala Lakota, born in Pine Ridge, South Dakota. He is a chef, entrepreneur, author, speaker and founder of the nonprofit, NATIFS (North American Traditional Indigenous Food Systems). He has been cooking for more than three decades around the world. He works to revitalize and increase awareness of indigenous food systems in a contemporary culinary context. He has won multiple fellowships and awards from organizations like the First Peoples Fund, the Bush Foundation and the James Beard Foundation. In the summer of 2021, he opened a restaurant in Minneapolis called Owamni by The Sioux Chef. You can learn more about his work from his website.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity

On his most recent work
We’ve done quite a bit over a short period of time. We’ve been working on the cookbook for the past couple years. We’ve been able to travel basically around the world to do events all over the place, to talk about our philosophy surrounding Indigenous foods and really trying to open up people’s eyes that no matter where you are in North America, there’s Indigenous history and culture and food and flavor. It’s just been a lot of great work for us and we’ve been able to grow a really cool team and we’re really excited for the launch of our nonprofit that we’re hoping will help build Indigenous restaurants all across the country.

On growing up on the Pine Ridge Reservation
Well, you know, I think the 70s are a different time era for people anyways, but growing up on Pine Ridge in the 70s and 80s, we just had a lot of freedom. We were out there in the country and we roamed around a bit and we were curious and we never stayed indoors. I think I only had two channels of TV, so that was not even an option compared to nowadays and we were on a ranch, so we had lots of horses and we were able to move around quite a bit. It is a different perspective than I think most people had

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My Kuzina offers some of the region’s best Greek food from a shipping container in Grand Prairie

Not too many years ago, a fellow food writer joked to me that there were no good restaurants in Grand Prairie. How quickly things change.

Now the choices on offer are nearly overwhelming. Much of the Dallas area’s West African community is concentrated in the suburb. The new Asia Times Square food court bustles with energy. On Main Street in Grand Prairie’s historic downtown, Zavala’s Barbecue just made Texas Monthly’s vaunted list of the state’s top 50 barbecue joints.

Only two doors down from Zavala’s stands an unassuming newcomer: a shipping container in which Athens native Dimitrios Vagenas is cooking some of the region’s best Greek food.

His business, My Kuzina, is primarily a meal-prep and catering service with pickup and delivery options. But My Kuzina’s kitchen also has a service window overlooking the patio of FireHouse Gastro Park, so it was only a matter of time before somebody asked if they could stay for lunch. Now the window is open on weekdays at lunchtime and Saturdays at lunch and dinner.

Vagenas was born and raised in Athens and only arrived in the United States in 2014, to join his wife, Margarita Takou, who’d made the move a few years earlier to get her Ph.D.

“He was very interested in the kitchen, helping his mom and his grandmother cooking,” Takou says. “A lot of his talent, he took that talent from his mom and his grandmother.” (Vagenas is the executive chef and owner, but he shyly suggested we interview his wife instead because “she does the talking.”)

After a childhood cooking with family, he went professional as an adult, attending culinary school in Athens and working on the island of Paros. In Texas, he spent years in kitchens at Omni Hotels in Dallas and Irving before getting furloughed in March 2020.

As Vagenas spent the pandemic months at home, cooking for his growing family, the idea for a Greek meal prep business came into focus. Originally My Kuzina was meant to be a ghost kitchen, before the FireHouse location offered the potential for more.

The spinach and rice casserole at Greek food truck My Kuzina in Grand Prairie
The spinach and rice
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Nina Furstenau’s food writing heightens senses of history, connection

Astute epicures might sit at a table, lift a fork or spoon to their mouths and trace each ingredient in a given dish. 

Place a plate before Nina Mukerjee Furstenau, and she starts tracing lines on a map. She connects dots between people, and across eras. And flashes of memory whisk her back in time, into kitchens where people have not only shared recipes with her but offered their stories.

“I can’t help myself,” Furstenau said. “When I look down, I’m seeing history. I’m seeing food identity, and who feels what foods represent their culture. It just deepens the experience for me.”

Furstenau applies this perceptive palate in her latest book, “Green Chili and Other Impostors,” available via University of Iowa Press next week. Within its pages, the Columbia-based food journalist deepens, then extends, understanding of cuisine as culture by visiting distinct Bengali communities in Kolkata and around India.

More:Meet Columbia artist Khia Thompson, who sounds out a fresh voice at Orr Street Studios

A journey from ‘Heartland’ to heritage

Nina Furstenau

Furstenau’s previous book, 2013’s “Biting through the Skin: An Indian Kitchen in America’s Heartland,” won the M.F.K. Fisher Grand Prize for Excellence in Culinary Writing for its soulful look at her childhood as a first-generation immigrant in Pittsburg, Kansas. In Furstenau’s work, the line separating food writing and lyrical biography is quite thin; our living and coming alive is bound up with food and the people who make it, a truth the writer underlines so well.

After the success of “Biting Through the Skin,” Furstenau longed to travel back a generation, to India and the deeper roots of her own relationship with family and food. A Fulbright scholarship propelled her to India for nine months before the pandemic.

In that time and place, absent an American lens, her already-rich vision of the world expanded. 

“Looking at history when you’re standing in Asia is a little different — at least it was for me,” Furstenau said. 

She crossed India’s threshold with an aim fixed in her mind — studying the “heritage foods of Bengal.” As the region opened

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