How food became a weapon in America’s culture war

On August 7, National Review published an article lambasting the US Department of Agriculture’s decision, announced in May, to broaden the prohibition of discrimination in federally funded nutrition programs, including the National School Lunch Program, to include sexual orientation and gender identity. The writer’s argument centered on a Christian school in Tampa, Fla., that, he wrote, was being “forced by the government to choose between adherence to the laws of man and those of God.”

There is disagreement over what the broader prohibition actually means, with the department insisting it is aimed only at ensuring that LGBTQ+ students and others are not denied access to these nutrition programs, either explicitly or through intimidation. But many conservatives say the change opens up schools and other institutions to lawsuits for not having gender-neutral bathrooms or for using pronouns that correspond to biological sex.   

There is much here to unpack, but that’s for another day. The relevant story, for our purposes, is in the op-ed’s headline: “A New Low in the Radical Left’s Culture War: The Weaponization of Food.”

The “weaponization of food” is nothing new, of course. For as long as there has been human conflict, food has been used as a weapon. The Romans starved Carthage. The Germans starved Leningrad during World War II. The CIA force-fed hunger-striking prisoners at Guantánamo Bay. And just this year, Russia bombed the Ukrainian port of Odessa to disrupt grain exports.

National Review, though, was getting at something different: food as a front in the nation’s ongoing culture war, a proxy for larger issues of character, morality, and patriotism.

The magazine’s finger-pointing at “the radical left” notwithstanding, it was the right that pioneered the use of food to smear its opponents—in this case, to frame liberals and progressives as “elite” pushers of the nanny state. The strategy took hold in the 1990s and evolved over the ensuing decades, as what we eat and how it’s produced became a national debate, and as culture clashes—over affirmative action, gay marriage, school curricula, abortion,

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PlantPlus Foods Closes $100 Million Acquisition Of Sol Cuisine To Expand Foothold In America’s Plant-Based Market place

Multinational joint venture PlantPlus Meals, made by two foods processing giants ADM and Marfrig in 2020, has formally shut the CA$125 million [approximately $100 million] deal with Canadian vegan food manufacturer Sol Delicacies — about two months after it bought Drink Take in Well LLC., the producer of Hilary’s allergen-friendly plant-based mostly solutions.

The two acquisitions collectively are anticipated to accelerate PlantPlus Foods’ ambition to acquire a “strong foothold” throughout Americas, in accordance to the company’s CEO John Pinto, who has over two a long time of CPG executive practical experience functioning at Coca-Cola

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“We were being born as a multinational corporation, and we want to expand aggressively,” Pinto recently advised me during a Zoom interview, noting how Marfrig’s operations and network in South America’s meat analogue sector will help deliver Sol Delicacies to the neighborhood sector as effectively.

Sol Cuisine’s earnings has achieved $4.5 million by Q3 2021, according to PitchBook details, and has amplified by 55.88% calendar year-over-yr in the course of the prior quarter.

Strategic Assets

Sol Delicacies started out in 1980 as a top quality tofu supplier to vegetarian dining places in Toronto, and has since developed to become a big alt protein player also developing non-GMO plant-dependent burgers and entrée appetizers. Founder and president, Dror Balshine, believes their acquisition by PlantPlus Meals will assist the enterprise proceed to provide optimistic effects on both human and planetary wellbeing.

“Our new partnership with Plant As well as Meals signifies Sol Cuisine will have the strategic assets to even further grow our community of ‘Sol Mates’ and proceed to innovate whilst growing our culinary concentrated products choices,” Balshine reported in a assertion. “Those strategic resources consist of best-in-class substances, operational support, and analysis and advancement.”

Chairman of the board at Sol Delicacies, Mike Fata, who launched and sold Manitoba Harvest Hemp Food items and has been a strategic CPG advisor and trader, also believes the offer will assistance accelerate the overall plant-based meals industry that could exceed 

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