Food items Friday 11/19/21: Holiday cooking with Jennifer Clair

Today on Foodstuff Friday, Jennifer Clair, founder of Property Cooking New York, provides her dwelling cooking suggestions and methods for the holiday seasons. WAMC’s Ray Graf hosts.

The range to contact with your inquiries is 1-800-348-2551. You can also e mail [email protected]

House Cooking New York

Jennifer Clair

Jennifer Clair released Residence Cooking New York in 2002. Right before that, she was a Recipe Editor for The Wall Avenue Journal and a Meals Editor at Martha Stewart Living, the place she designed cookbooks and managed the Cooking & Entertaining department of marthastewart.com. She graduated from Peter Kump’s New York Cooking School in 1998 immediately after receiving a entire James Beard Basis scholarship. Jennifer is also the creator of 6 Simple Cooking Strategies: Culinary Necessities for the Household Cook (2018) centered on the school’s most popular cooking course, and the host of the cooking podcast, Kitchen Radio.

Pumpkin Pie (serves 8)

For the crust:

  • 1 ¼ cups all-objective flour, in addition more for dusting
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 adhere unsalted butter, chilled and minimize into smaller items
  • 4 tablespoons ice h2o

For the filling:

  • 3 significant eggs
  • 1 15-ounce can pumpkin purée (not “pumpkin pie filling”)
  • 1 ½ cups large product, half and 50 percent, or coconut milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ¾ cup darkish-brown sugar
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice
  • Whipped product, for serving

1. In a large mixing bowl, merge the flour, salt and sugar. Include the butter parts, and applying your fingers, rub the butter into the flour combination until finally the butter pieces are the dimension of peas and coated with flour. Drizzle the cold h2o about the mixture and use a fork to mix it with the dry elements, till a dough just begins to form. Clean up off the fork and go on doing work the dough with your palms right up until it retains with each other and resembles a b all of dough (do not overmix overmixing potential customers to a dense, non-flaky crust). This can also be accomplished in a food processor.

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What Is Cassava? And How to Use it for Cooking

In this country, the question of how to round out a meal of meat and vegetables with a starch usually leads straight to the potato. But in other regions of the world, particularly Latin America, Africa, and parts of Asia, the answer is frequently cassava. Large, starchy, and seemingly inedible when raw, the tuber can initially be intimidating, especially if you’ve never prepared one or lack a cultural connection to it — its rough skin and rootlike appearance might make you question how long it will need to boil until you can realistically sink your teeth into it. But for much of the world’s growing population, cassava is a major source of sustenance, making it a big player in our increasingly complicated food chain.

While cassava has recently become more visible in this country as an ingredient in health-conscious snacks and plant-based food products, it hasn’t quite found its way onto the average American’s dinner table. A lack of awareness is undoubtedly a factor, but cassava also finds itself the target of misinformation and even controversy. Needless to say, this important but misunderstood tuber deserves a closer look.

What is cassava?

Also commonly known as yuca or manioc, cassava is a tuber crop native to South America. The root grows similarly to potatoes, yams, or ginger by swelling underneath the earth to store nutrients for the following season. For centuries, cassava was eaten by Indigenous communities who live along the banks of the Amazon river, where it is believed to have originated.

From the ground up, cassava looks like a tall, thin tree with long leaves that can grow up to 3 meters in height. The thick roots underneath the surface are what usually get consumed as food, but the leaves are commonly eaten in West African cuisines as well.

There are two main varieties of cassava: sweet and bitter. The sweet variety is what you’ll find at your local supermarket and in cassava-based products; its flavor profile is mild, somewhat nutty, and subtly sweet. When boiled, both its taste and texture are very reminiscent of a cooked potato ready

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