26 Useful Cooking Lessons From International Cuisines

“Even a small amount of it in scrambled eggs, to sauté vegetables, or to finish off homemade sauces makes a world of difference to the flavor and texture.”

Cuisines from around the world are all different, yet they all rely on certain techniques and lessons that can be adopted and applied to your home cooking. So Redditor u/CreatureWarrior asked “What are some cool and useful things different cuisines have taught you?” Here’s what people said.


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(And I loved this question so much, I even threw in a few of my own responses.)

1.

“Cooking dishes from Indian cuisine really showed me that being vegetarian or introducing more plant-based dishes into your routine really doesn’t have to be that hard. Moreover, vegetarian dishes can be just as tasty as those containing meat. Indian cooking taught me that using ‘fake meats’ really isn’t necessary at all. I was so intrigued by some meatless Indian dishes like Punjabi Rajma Masala (kidney bean curry) that I realized I need to further explore the potential of veggies.”

2.

“Learning how to make the specific Italian dish cacio e pepe helped me understand the meaning of ‘less is more.’ This dish is just pasta, good olive oil, fresh black pepper, and Parmesan cheese, but these simple ingredients work together to create something so delicious.”

3.

“Thai cuisine really taught me how to balance strong flavors. Thai style salads (called ‘yum’) are so diverse, but they always share the same flavor profile: they are salty, spicy, sour, sweet and umami all at once. The way you achieve this complexity all comes down to learning how to balance ingredients rather than shy away from them or reduce them.”

4.

“Cooking Italian cuisine taught me the magic of anchovies and anchovy paste. These flavor-packed little fish get an unfair reputation. While on their own, they may be off-putting to some people, they add a salty depth of flavor to so many dishes, from aiolis and pastas to roasted vegetables and dressings. I cook with them all the time now.”

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What Twin Cities chefs from around the world are cooking for Thanksgiving

In many Minnesota households this Thanksgiving, the main meal is all about turkey, stuffing, cranberry sauce and mashed potatoes — or Venezuelan hallacas, Mexican mole, Indian bread pudding and Jamaican jerk-spiced turkey. Six Twin Cities chefs who hail from around the globe tell us, in their own words, what’s on their Thanksgiving tables.

Interviews have been edited and condensed.

Venezuelan

Soleil Ramirez

Richard Tsong-Taatarii, Star Tribune

Chef Soleil Ramirez at her restaurant, Arepa Bar, with hallacas, a Venezuelan holiday dish
she’ll be serving for Thanksgiving.

My grandpa was born in New York, so in my family, we always have a little bit of Venezuela and a little bit of American culture. For Thanksgiving, we get together and cook the turkey, but we actually eat our Christmas food. So it’s a little bit of both countries mixed in.

There are three or four items we always make. One of them is hallacas. I think hallacas represent Venezuela 100%. Hallacas were made a very long time ago when the Spaniards came to what they called the Indian islands, and Venezuela was a part of that. The Spaniard people would throw away all their leftovers, and the slaves and native people weren’t able to eat any of that. They didn’t have enough food or water or anything. So they started to pick from the floor from the leftovers people threw away, and they started to wrap all these up in plantain leaves and hide it in the ground. And of course, corn, in South America, grows everywhere. So they started to make a dough with corn, and would mix the dough with all these leftovers. And that is what we call today hallacas. It was like surviving, you know?

Provided

Soleil Ramirez makes hallacas for Thanksgiving both at home and at her restaurant, Arepa Bar.

It’s pork, beef, chicken, raisins, olives, almonds, capers. All of this is cooked in red wine and it’s kind of a stew, but thicker. It’s called guiso. And the plantain is used to wrap all of this up. People think Venezuelan food is similar to Mexican food, and

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Food items Friday 11/19/21: Holiday cooking with Jennifer Clair

Today on Foodstuff Friday, Jennifer Clair, founder of Property Cooking New York, provides her dwelling cooking suggestions and methods for the holiday seasons. WAMC’s Ray Graf hosts.

The range to contact with your inquiries is 1-800-348-2551. You can also e mail [email protected]

House Cooking New York

Jennifer Clair

Jennifer Clair released Residence Cooking New York in 2002. Right before that, she was a Recipe Editor for The Wall Avenue Journal and a Meals Editor at Martha Stewart Living, the place she designed cookbooks and managed the Cooking & Entertaining department of marthastewart.com. She graduated from Peter Kump’s New York Cooking School in 1998 immediately after receiving a entire James Beard Basis scholarship. Jennifer is also the creator of 6 Simple Cooking Strategies: Culinary Necessities for the Household Cook (2018) centered on the school’s most popular cooking course, and the host of the cooking podcast, Kitchen Radio.

Pumpkin Pie (serves 8)

For the crust:

  • 1 ¼ cups all-objective flour, in addition more for dusting
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 adhere unsalted butter, chilled and minimize into smaller items
  • 4 tablespoons ice h2o

For the filling:

  • 3 significant eggs
  • 1 15-ounce can pumpkin purée (not “pumpkin pie filling”)
  • 1 ½ cups large product, half and 50 percent, or coconut milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ¾ cup darkish-brown sugar
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice
  • Whipped product, for serving

1. In a large mixing bowl, merge the flour, salt and sugar. Include the butter parts, and applying your fingers, rub the butter into the flour combination until finally the butter pieces are the dimension of peas and coated with flour. Drizzle the cold h2o about the mixture and use a fork to mix it with the dry elements, till a dough just begins to form. Clean up off the fork and go on doing work the dough with your palms right up until it retains with each other and resembles a b all of dough (do not overmix overmixing potential customers to a dense, non-flaky crust). This can also be accomplished in a food processor.

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What Is Cassava? And How to Use it for Cooking

In this country, the question of how to round out a meal of meat and vegetables with a starch usually leads straight to the potato. But in other regions of the world, particularly Latin America, Africa, and parts of Asia, the answer is frequently cassava. Large, starchy, and seemingly inedible when raw, the tuber can initially be intimidating, especially if you’ve never prepared one or lack a cultural connection to it — its rough skin and rootlike appearance might make you question how long it will need to boil until you can realistically sink your teeth into it. But for much of the world’s growing population, cassava is a major source of sustenance, making it a big player in our increasingly complicated food chain.

While cassava has recently become more visible in this country as an ingredient in health-conscious snacks and plant-based food products, it hasn’t quite found its way onto the average American’s dinner table. A lack of awareness is undoubtedly a factor, but cassava also finds itself the target of misinformation and even controversy. Needless to say, this important but misunderstood tuber deserves a closer look.

What is cassava?

Also commonly known as yuca or manioc, cassava is a tuber crop native to South America. The root grows similarly to potatoes, yams, or ginger by swelling underneath the earth to store nutrients for the following season. For centuries, cassava was eaten by Indigenous communities who live along the banks of the Amazon river, where it is believed to have originated.

From the ground up, cassava looks like a tall, thin tree with long leaves that can grow up to 3 meters in height. The thick roots underneath the surface are what usually get consumed as food, but the leaves are commonly eaten in West African cuisines as well.

There are two main varieties of cassava: sweet and bitter. The sweet variety is what you’ll find at your local supermarket and in cassava-based products; its flavor profile is mild, somewhat nutty, and subtly sweet. When boiled, both its taste and texture are very reminiscent of a cooked potato ready

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