Six Italian restaurants in Columbus where you can get terrific pasta

Colder weather phone calls for heat, filling dishes, and few in good shape the monthly bill superior than pasta.

While lots of world cuisines have some type of noodle dish, Italian pasta generally 1st arrives to mind.

And the ideal detail about Italian dining establishments in Greater Columbus is the level of range and talent that goes into earning some of the city’s finest pasta dishes.

Gimme a hand:Five neighborhood dishes to try to eat devoid of utensils

It is not uncommon to come across do-it-yourself pasta twirled in an genuine rustic sauce and contemporary elements.

We all have our favorites, from community, red-sauce places to eat to extra refined destinations. Still, noodles are a wonderful car or truck for chefs to express their creativity and, frequently, just provide a nice plate of comforting meals.

Below are six pasta dishes to check out in Columbus.

Little and unpretentious, Caffe DaVinci is the quintessential neighborhood spot, dishing up basic American-Italian favorites for 16 many years.

Even with its modest menu and selling prices, Caffe DaVinci tends to make substantially of its food stuff from scratch, together with the spaghetti, tomato sauce and all-beef meatball ($18.20).

For something a little more fancy, try Novella Osteria's butternut squash ravioli.

Owner Matthew Phelan grew up in Dublin and analyzed for a diploma in communications at The Ohio Condition College prior to packing up his cutlery and heading to New York, the place he discovered a diverse type of ability: Italian strategy.

Positioned in a new building, Novella Osteria has an deliberately worn, Outdated Planet glimpse.

Phelan is major about the meals he plates, especially pasta.

A perennial preferred dish is the butternut squash ravioli ($24). Adding creaminess and an assertive bite are mascarpone, Grana Padano and pecorino. The ravioli are tossed with sage brown butter and garnished with toasted pumpkin seeds, aged balsamic and chestnuts.

Always something new:Repetition not on the menu at impressive Aubergine Personal Dining Club

"Chanel No. 5," a seafood and pasta dish, was photographed in Johnny's Italian Steakhouse in the combined Hilton Garden Inn/Homewood Suites on Morse Road.

Johnny’s Italian Steakhouse, which opened previously this yr on the Significantly North Aspect of Columbus, is reminiscent of the Italian supper clubs of yore.

Located in the Hilton Backyard Inn and Homewood Suites intricate in the

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It’s all in the mix: five London restaurants marrying very different global cuisines

This article is part of a guide to London from FT Globetrotter

“Fusion is a term that no longer has meaning,” French celebrity chef Cyril Lignac wrote to me from Paris, describing the concept behind his Mayfair outpost Bar des Prés with its marked Japanese and French references. His feelings about the 1990s restaurant buzzword, since fallen out of favour, are nothing new in the culinary world, and far from isolated: Washington DC-based chef Tim Ma, of the now closed Asian-French restaurant Kyirisan, used to instruct his staff to never, under any circumstances, ever describe their food as fusion; Daikaya chef Katsuya Fukushima once said that he preferred to describe his creations as “freestyle . . . kind of like how jazz musicians can get together and jam”; and Washingtonian food editor Jessica Sidman likened the term to the culinary world’s F-word.

If it’s true that, as explained by food historian and Parma university professor Alberto Grandi, the most authentic kind of Parmesan cheese can now only be found in Wisconsin, that carbonara pasta was invented by American soldiers during the second world war, and that there is no such thing as a starter outside of France, all those hoping to neatly catalogue cuisines within national borders — and the mix thereof — should give up. “All food is fusion in a city like London,” says the co-founder of Angelina, a Japanese-Italian eatery in Dalston.

While categorising any food as fusion is dated, there are a host of new eateries in London leaving the now-unfashionable ’90s approach behind in favour of a creative and thoughtful new take on the F-word. Long gone are the days of dishes such as ramen burgers, Thai red curry risotto and Brussels sprout sushi. Instead, these radical new menus subtly reference established traditions, drawing inspiration from existing recipes and niche ingredients while testing the limits of culinary creativity — and the results are both surprising and exquisite.

As I have our readers’ best interests at heart, I took upon myself the Herculean task of trying many of them for you, so you can

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Best New Resorts, Restaurants, and Shows in Las Vegas

Even the taxi driver from the airport was impressed. “Damn,” he said, as a dancing, 23-story Katy Perry beckoned us up the driveway of Resorts World, a new Las Vegas hotel complex with a 100,000-square-foot LED video screen on one of its glass flanks. So distracted was the driver by Katy’s sci-fi sashaying that he dropped me at the wrong entrance. I was booked in at Crockfords, an ultra-luxury hotel-within-a-hotel that joins Hilton and Conrad properties to make up this 3,506-room, $4.3 billion mega-resort. But instead I found myself on the casino floor — and promptly got lost in a space as cavernous as an airplane hangar.

Happily succumbing to the sensory overload, I drifted from the chiming poker machines and roulette tables to an Asian street-food arcade, where I used a digital kiosk to order Singapore noodles and a plate of South Indian roti from an array of spice-scented hawker stalls. Along the way, I stopped to admire displays of sacred Vegas relics: an oil painting by Liberace and one of his limousines — a white Rolls-Royce covered with mirror tiles. When I did eventually find Crockfords, I was whisked to my room on the 65th floor, where floor-to-ceiling windows maximized my view of the mountains of the Nevada desert. Below me the electric Katy danced away in silence, like something between “Blade Runner” and “Attack of the 50-Foot Woman.”

Two scenes from Las Vegas, showing a postcard-style mural, and two showgirls walking on the strip

From left: A mural in the Arts District; Las Vegas Boulevard is once again packed with visitors and performers. | Credit: David Williams

Nobody goes to Las Vegas in search of subtlety or moderation. When it comes to over-the-top glitz, the city has been outdoing itself ever since Brooklyn mobster Bugsy Siegel’s Flamingo Hotel & Casino rose like a mirage from the desert in 1946. So it’s not surprising that the city used the closures brought on by the pandemic to up the ante yet again. Large-scale resorts opened (Resorts World, Circa, Virgin), while landmarks like the Bellagio took the opportunity to

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Opening nightmare: launching a restaurant into a world stricken by Covid and Brexit | Restaurants

Every morning last autumn, as he took the short walk from Farringdon station in central London to his new restaurant, Russell Norman came face to face with a ghost. The pandemic had hit the hospitality sector hard, and this stretch of takeaway outfits and dine-in burger chains was no exception. A Byron, a Coco di Mama, an Itsu – all long gone, doors locked, interiors dark. And then, just before the final right turn, the one that really hurt, the words on its signage removed but the outline unmistakable: Polpo.

The Venetian-inspired restaurant, which took its name from the Italian for “octopus”, had been a breakout success for Norman in the early 2010s. With its small plates, no-reservations policy and stripped-down interiors, the original Soho site had been credited with reinventing casual dining after the Great Recession. But then, like so many brands that emerged during the same period, it started to expand: taking on investors, extending tentacles across the UK, and then collapsing in instalments from 2016 onwards. Most of its sites were forced to close in the context of a broader casual dining crunch, as the cost of running a restaurant rose and the number of customers fell. These days, just two Polpos survive, in Soho and in Chelsea, west London, under the management of Norman’s former business partner Richard Beatty. Norman’s own departure from the project was finalised in June 2020.

Now, after a hiatus, he was back. For years, Norman had wanted to open an old-fashioned trattoria, replicating the homely, family run restaurants of Italy for a central London audience. A 2017 trip to Tuscany had brought his vision into sharper focus. Many of the region’s most celebrated dishes are rooted in the tradition of cucina povera (“poor cooking”), which makes resourceful use of pasta, beans, bread and offal. The food is nourishing and full of flavour, but beige and unphotogenic. In recognition of this, the restaurant would be called Brutto – or, in English, Ugly.

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Almost from the start, the name

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